Rough Concept Sketch

Rough Concept Sketch

I wanted to get rid of my cheesy Walmart entertainment center that I had for years in every apartment I had lived in before. Ideally I wanted my TV mounted above my fireplace mantel, however my fireplace is tiled in a beautiful travertine tile. The last thing I wanted to do was damage the tile by drilling into it. It would also leave the problem of routing all my wiring as well. One night as some friends were over for beers we came up with an idea. Overly complicated but definitely fitting of my industrial design tastes, the next day I got to sketching.

Design

Getting Down to the Details

Getting Down to the Details

 

After getting the general idea lined out I started getting into the details. Measuring out the stud spacings and figuring out how to make everything look right was the hardest part. The studs were not spaced evenly from the edges of the fireplace so I came up with a wall plate design that used 4 bolts on each side that went into the stud and 4 that were just for looks. This allowed me to make up the spacing difference without being noticed by anyone!

Plans and Templates

Plans and Templates

 

Once the final design was done I prepared the plans with detailed dimensions. I also made full size templates of the wall mount plates in order to make life easier during fabrication. The plans also included holes through the wall plates that would allow me to route my AV cables through the tubes then through the wall and into a cabinet in the spare bedroom on the other side of the wall. Enough over engineering, time to start fabricating.

 Fabrication

Wall Plates

Wall Plates

Fabrication took place over 2 nights (another thank you to Scott). The first night we cut, drilled, and welded the wall plates and cross bars. The wall plates are fabricated from 1/4″ steel plate, this is obviously overkill but is mainly for style. The 8 holes are drilled for passing 5/8″ lag bolts, again overkill! In the lower cross bar I cut out and chamfered the corner to allow for a large bend radius on the AV cables. The cross bars are fabricated from 1.75″ square 16 gauge steel tubing. I wanted to keep these pieces as light as I could.

Corner Detail for Wire Routing

Corner Detail for Wire Routing

 

The second night we finished up the fabrication by welding the the cross bars to the wall plates. The final detail was to attach some perforated stainless steel I was able to score (Thanks Jimmy). Lastly was to bolt my original wall mount bracket to some 1/2″ angle iron that was welded in. All that was left was to load it into my Jeep and take it home.

TV9

Assembling the Pieces

Perforated Stainless

Perforated Stainless

Ready for Installation

Ready for Installation

 

 Installation

Bolting In-Place

Bolting In-Place

Finally I transported the structure home and prepared to hoist it into place. This is was not as hard as I would have thought. I simply installed one lag bolt on one side, leveled the cross bars, drilled and finally installed one lag on the opposite side. That really would have been plenty to support the whole piece, however I felt it still necesary to install 6 more 3″ long 5/8″ lag bolts! Then each side got 4 more 1″ long 5/8″ lag bolts to fill the holes that weren’t used to suspend the piece. If this house blows down, this wall is coming out in one piece!

40" LCD Installed

40″ LCD Installed

TV13

Industrial is Understatement

The last step to the install was to replace some lighting. The wall plates covered up the location of two wall mounted light fixtures. Without them the room was very dark and hard to light since there is no ceiling fixture. A quick trip to Lowes and a couple of simple light fixtures and I was completely done with the installation.

 

Simple Fixture

Simple Fixture

 

The Payoff

Another project that I absolutely loved the outcome.

Fin.

Fin.